Articles

Tibetan Medicine: A Unique Heritage of Person-Centered Medicine

(100.34 kB)

DETAILS
File Name: tibetan medicine_a unique heritage_ROBERTI di SARSINA.pdf
File Size: 100.34 kB
Author: Paolo Roberti di Sarsina
Email: paolo[dot]robertidisarsina[at]unimib[dot]it
Date: 14. January 2013

 

Traditional, Complementary and Alternative medical systems and their contribution to Personalisation Prediction and Prevention in Medicine

 (626.37 kB)

DETAILS
File Name: tibetan medicine_a unique heritage_ROBERTI di SARSINA.pdf
File Size: 100.34 kB
Author: Paolo Roberti di Sarsina
Email: paolo[dot]robertidisarsina[at]unimib[dot]it
Date: 14. January 2013

 

Chögyal Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche: Dzogchen and Tibetan Tradition. From Shang Shung to the West

(483.84 kB)

DETAILS
File Name: chnn_ROBERTI di SARSINA.pdf
File Size: 483.84 kB
Author: Paolo Roberti di Sarsina
Email: paolo[dot]robertidisarsina[at]unimib[dot]it
Date: 14. January 2013

 

Tibetan Oracles and Himalayan Shamans

(279.79 kB)

DETAILS
File Name: tibetan oracles and himalayan shamans.pdf
File Size: 279.79 kB
Author: Dr Fabian Sanders
Email: fsanders[at]unive[dot]it
Date: 08. February 2013

 

Conservation of Tibetan Thangka Paintings from the National Museum of Ireland, Dublin

(3.18 MB)

DETAILS
File Name: wheeler heady - conservation thangka paintings nmireland.pdf
File Size: 3.18 MB
Date: 03. July 2013
Description:

Proceedings of the Forum on the Conservation of Thangkas Special Session of the ICOM-CC 15th Triennial Conference, New Delhi, India, September 26, 2008. Hosted by the Working Group on Ethnographic Collections, the Textiles Working Group and the Paintings Working Group
Editors: Mary Ballard and Carole Dignard
Published by the International Council of Museums – Committee for Conservation (ICOM-CC)
© ICOM-CC 2009

 

On Dealing with Destructive Emotions through the Path of Self-Liberation

(85.06 kB)

DETAILS
File Name: on dealing with destructive emotions through the path of self-liberation.pdf
File Size: 85.06 kB
Date: 19. July 2013
Description:

Abstract: In the majority of Buddhist systems and traditions, destructive emotions—hatred, craving and delusion—are considered as the main obstacle to enlightenment and dealt with as such through various methods of counteracting and neutralizing. In the supreme teaching of Dzogchen, however, they are but one of the infinite aspects of the primordially self-perfected dimension of the true nature of mind. Thus they are allowed to show their utterly harmless essence—non-ego, beyond-good-and-evil, empty and luminous—through the path of self-liberation.